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Gioacchino Rossini

Tuesday, August 23, 2016


My Classical Notes

August 8

Cellist Sol Gabetta Performs

My Classical NotesI love the sound of the Cello, because of its deep and warm tone in the hands of a mature artist. This CD gives us a large variety of cello melodies as performed by Sol Gabetta: Casals: El Cant dels Ocells (Song of the birds) Chopin: Nocturne No. 4 in F major, Op. 15 No. 1, with Bertrand Chamayou (piano) Delibes: Les filles de Cadix Dvorak: Waldesruhe (Silent woods) for cello and orchestra, Op. 68 No. 5 Rondo in G minor for cello & orchestra, Op. 94, B. 181 Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85 Fauré: Pavane, Op. 50 Rimsky Korsakov: Flight of the Bumble Bee Rossini: Largo al factotum (from Il barbiere di Siviglia) Saint-Saëns: Le carnaval des animaux: Le Cygne Tchaikovsky: Kuda, Kuda ‘Lensky’s Aria’ (from Eugene Onegin Andante Cantabile (from String Quartet No. 1 in D Op. 11) Vasks: Musique du Soir Vivaldi: The Four Seasons: Winter, RV297 All performed by Sol Gabetta (cello) Sol Gabetta is an exceptional young cellist, and this is an exceptional compilation of the work she has done in the recording studio so far in her short career. In addition to Elgar’s Cello Concerto, there are also some Elgar salon works, and a couple of really worthwhile short pieces by Dvorak: Silent Woods and the Rondo. The second dosc is mainly given over to short encore pieces such as, inevitably, Saint-Saens’s The Swan , and less obviously, Pablo Casals’s beautiful reworking of a Catalan folk song, The Song of the Birds. Here is Sol Gabetta in the Cello Sonata by Johannes Brahms:

Tribuna musical

Yesterday

Vengerov and Saitkoulov: from correction to brilliance

Maxim Vengerov, born 1974, was a child prodigy who won great competitions at an early age: the Wieniawski at ten and the Carl Flesch at fifteen. He went on to have a great career and be recognised as one of the leading violinists of our times, fortunately prodigal in this specialty. Nowadays he is also a conductor and teacher, and has his own Festival. An interesting point: during the recent decade he took a three-year sabbatical from playing; during that time he studied conducting . He came to Buenos Aires several times, the last playing a Chinese concerto with the Shanghai Symphony; although his playing was admirable, the work was subpar and hardly up to his capacities. But late in 2011 he gave a splendid recital of sustained quality, blending ideally intellectual comprehension with virtuoso realisation. Unfortunately I don´t keep archives and can´t vouchsafe if his pianist was Roustem Saitkoulov, but he is Vengerov´s habitual partner, it might have been him. Hand programme biographies should provide information about earlier visits to BA, but they are always mere translations of a standard international biography. I remember that years ago the Mozarteum made it a point of mentioning previous contacts with the artists; I wish they did that again in the future. Saitkoulov is a distinguished pianist in his own right; also,H he does a lot of chamber work. Born at Kazan, Russia, he studied with the great Elisso Virsaladze at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory (she came twice here) and then completed his training in Munich. He won important competitions: the Ferruccio Busoni (Bolzano), Géza Anda (Zürich), Marguerite Long (Paris). He has played with important orchestras and given recitals throughout the world. By the way, he accepts the French version of his name and surname; for us or for Great Britain and USA, it should be Rustem Saitkulov (we write Mussorgsky, not Moussorgsky). So there were good reasons to expect from this Mozarteum concert (repeated with the same programme) a very high level. Technically it was of course impeccable, but the interpretations began coldly, more so in the case of Vengerov. The sonatas chosen were enticing: Schubert´s Sonata in A, D.574, pompously called "Grand Duet"; and Beethoven´s marvelous Sonata Nº 7, in C minor, Op.30 Nº2. Schubert´s sonata was written young, at 20, but his personality is clear from the very beginning, a delicious Allegro moderato. Who else wrote such melodies or was so subtle in the harmonic modulations? He also wrote three other sonatas, a bit less inspired and developed, called Sonatinas by the editor. All of them were published posthumously, the same sad destiny of his symphonies 8 and 9. I fell in love with the sonata in my youth with the wonderful recording by Kreisler and Rachmaninov, for it has charm and beauty: Kreisler sings with captivating timbre, and the great Russian virtuoso adapts to the intimate style perfectly.Too much sliding from Kreisler? Agreed, but he is irresistible. And that´s contrary to what I felt from Vengerov: an academic, correct reading with no involvement. During the interval, a veteran friend said: "it´s as if he were afraid of producing any sound that isn´t round and smooth". Yes, all exact but with little energy and attack. Saitkoulov was better; however, the final result was placid in the wrong sense. As Claudia Guzmán rightly says in her comments referring to Beethoven´s Seventh Sonata: "never until then a work for piano and violin had displayed such dramatic intensity nor had required similar temporal proportions". It is a C minor masterpiece in the same rank as the "Pathetic" Piano Sonata and the Third Piano Concerto. No namby-pamby approach can deal with such a score. Things went gradually better, fired by the greater intensity and virtuoso playing of Soutkulov, but only got to the desirable grade of electricity from both in the last movement. Said my friend: "there I found Beethoven". But things changed, and the whole Second Part, as well as the four encores, went swimmingly. Both showed complete identification with that peculiar Ravel Second Sonata: he believed that piano and violin are incompatible and the music echoes that idea: the players oppose each other instead of being complemental. And you know, it works! The Blues is the best movement and it was played with ideal sinuosity. And then came a final virtuoso section starting with a violin solo piece: Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst´s Variations on "The Last Rose of Summer", Nº 6 of the Polyphonic Etudes for solo violin. The piece on the lovely Irish tune is the devil to play and rarely done; Vengerov at twelve presented it at the Tchaikovsky International Competition. Here he showed the complete range of his fantastic technique. A quiet and reflexive Paganini, the Cantabile Op.17, originally for violin and guitar, was done in a transcription for violin and piano. The final score was the Kreisler arrangement for violin and piano of Paganini´s "I palpiti" for violin and orchestra, Introduction and Variations on a theme from Rossini´s "Tancredi" (the aria "Di tanti palpiti"), a true catalogue of Paganini´s technical innovations, splendidly played. Four encores: two of those inimitable Kreisler pieces that Beecham would have called "lollipops": the famous "Viennese Caprice" and the dynamic "Chinese tambourine". Rachmaninov´s beautiful Vocalise, transcribed from the original for orchestra. And Brahms´ ever so popular Hungarian Dance Nº5, in the Joachim arrangement. All done with panache by the artists. For Buenos Aires Herald




Royal Opera House

August 5

11 breathtaking opera houses to follow on Instagram

Top Opera House Instagrams to follow © (Left to right) Bolshoi Theatre, Royal Opera House, Lincoln Centre, Sydney Opera House, Kungliga Operan and Teatro alla Scala 'All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players', so said William Shakespeare over 400 years ago. It's a saying that still rings true – the art of performance, whether on stage or off, has entranced people for centuries. And while the artistry of the performers should never be called into question, there's undoubtedly something special about these stages. Beautiful structures inside and out, set in the heart of cities across the world, let's take a look at the world's most breathtaking opera house Instagram accounts: La Scala - Milan, Italy Built in 1778, La Scala is one of the oldest opera houses in the world. The auditorium was originally illuminated with 84 oil lamps, with another thousand lighting the rest of the theatre. With pre-electric technology however, came increased risk of fire and so buckets full of water were hung on the walls around the auditorium. Aspettando la prova antegenerale de/waiting for the pre-dress rehearsal of #LafanciulladelWest in scena dal/on stage from 3 al/to 28 maggio/May #riccardochailly #opera #puccini #lascala #teatroallascala #robertcarsen A photo posted by Teatro alla Scala (@teatroallascala) on Apr 27, 2016 at 9:23am PDT Kungliga Operan - Stockholm, Sweden King Gustave III turned away the French Opera Troupe in the years before The Royal Swedish Opera was built because he wanted to create an opera house that could perform Swedish productions. The Kungliga Operan was constructed next to the Royal Palace on the Norrström River and so the national home of opera and ballet was born. In a cruel twist, the king was actually murdered at his beloved opera house; he was shot at a masked ball in 1792. The assassination would later inspire Verdi's Un ballo in maschera . Knappt två veckor till säsongsstart och det ska fejas och det ska fixas. Nu har stora ljuskronan kommit ner för sin årliga upp-piffning! Den 19 augusti har vi nypremiär på Carmen! //Roy, guide & gästpostare på Operan #kungligaoperan #livetpåoperan #lifeattheopera #sommarpåoperan A photo posted by Kungliga Operan (@kungligaoperan) on Aug 7, 2015 at 12:35am PDT Teatro Colón - Buenos Aires, Argentina Teatro Colón was built in 1857 as a performance venue for overseas companies stopping in the Argentine capital. It was nearly 70 years before the theatre saw its resident opera and ballet companies established. The interior design echoes the European style, but the ceiling was repainted by Argentinian landscape painter Raúl Soldi in the 1960s. His inspiration was the South American sky. Cúpula A photo posted by Teatro Colón (@teatrocolon) on Jun 23, 2016 at 10:20am PDT Lincoln Center - New York City, USA Philanthropist John D. Rockefeller III was part of the 1950s initiative to create a new cultural hub in New York. He reportedly raised more than half of the $185 million need to build the complex. The center features a huge variety of dance, music and film performances and is home to The Metropolitan Opera and the New York City Ballet . The #blizzard begins. Stay safe and warm, East Coasters. #snow #lincolncenter #nyc #newyork #blizzardof2015 #architecture A photo posted by Lincoln Center (@lincolncenter) on Jan 26, 2015 at 5:14pm PST The Bolshoi - Moscow, Russia Surviving both revolution and fire, the Bolshoi Theatre has been rebuilt several time during its history. Its iconic facade can be seen on the Russian 100 ruble banknote. The theatre was closed for six years in 2005 for some serious renovation work that was said to have cost upward of 25.5 billion rubles (£650 million) and during this period, performances were held at the Great Kremlin Palace. The Bolshoi Ballet regularly perform at Covent Garden as part of their London Seasons . Большой театр сегодня празднует свое 240-летие! Спасибо, что остаетесь с нами! The Bolshoi celebrates the 240th anniversary today! Thank you for staying with us! #большойтеатр #большой #балет #большойбалет #опера #юбилей #bolshoi #bolshoitheatre #ballet #bolshoiballet #opera #anniversary #happybirthday A photo posted by Большой Театр (@bolshoi_theatre) on Mar 28, 2016 at 8:05am PDT Glyndebourne - Sussex, UK Glyndebourne Opera House is in the grounds of an English country house beside the South Downs in East Sussex. Its famous summer festival has happened every year since 1934 – apart from a brief closure during World War II. Works are performed in the purpose-built opera house (rebuilt in 1994), but much of the day is spent outside, where audiences are encouraged to dress up in black-tie and bring a picnic to enjoy in the garden. @whitecubeofficial at Glyndebourne opens this weekend - to celebrate our Shop have collaborated with White Cube artist Raqib Shaw in developing this beautiful organic wool blanket - perfect for a Glyndebourne #picnic or to use as a luxurious throw. Ps Don’t forget to visit the Shop for all your picnicking needs! Product details: Limited edition blanket featuring the print: Phileas and I Under the Full Moon - A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2016) is on sale now. Link in profile Sam Stephenson A photo posted by Glyndebourne (@glyndebourne) on May 18, 2016 at 6:50am PDT Sydney Opera House - Sydney, Australia Inspired by the ship sails that sail Sydney Harbour, the city's famous opera house is one of the most iconic buildings in the world. More than 8 million people visit the theatre to marvel at the concrete shells designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon - visitors can even climb them on a tour. Following a dispute with other stakeholders during the build, Utzon left Australia never to return. He famously never saw his masterpiece in its completed state. We have our head in the clouds this morning! #sydneyskies #sydneyoperahouse A photo posted by Sydney Opera House (@sydneyoperahouse) on Jun 26, 2016 at 3:51pm PDT Paris Opéra - Paris, France The Paris Opéra perform in two very different spaces in the French capital. Built in the 19th century, the Palais Garnier is the older of the company's two theatres, and has become an important landmark in the city alongside the Notre Dame and the Louvre . The second site Opéra Bastille , now the main facility of the Paris National Opera , was designed to provide a ‘populace and modern’ space for audiences. Incontournable : le Grand Foyer du Palais Garnier. #art #architecture #visite #mustsee #PalaisGarnier #PaulBaudry ©Jean-Pierre Delagarde/OnP A photo posted by Opéra national de Paris (@operadeparis) on Jul 27, 2016 at 5:09am PDT Opéra de Monte Carlo - Monaco The Salle Garnier was designed by the same architect who created the Palais Garnier in Paris. Monaco’s version is much smaller, seating only 524 compared to the Parisian version which can seat an audience of over 2,000. The Salle Garnier was used to celebrate the centenary of Monte Carlo by King Rainier III and his American film star wife, Grace Kelly . Lieu de création depuis 1879, l'Opéra de Monte-Carlo baigné par la mer méditerranée rejoint l'aventure instagram. Photo: Jean Grisoni #opera #operademontecarlo #montecarlo #principautedemonaco #monaco #garnier #sallegarnier #igers #igersfrance A photo posted by Opéra de Monte-Carlo (@opera_de_monte_carlo) on Oct 28, 2014 at 5:29am PDT Teatro San Carlo - Naples, Italy Said to be the oldest ‘continuously active’ public opera house still in existance, Naples is home to the oldest horseshoe shaped auditorium in the world. Rossini , Donizetti , Verdi were all composers in residence here. The interior inspired subsequent opera houses around Europe and includes gold decoration, sumptuous blue upholstery and 184 boxes. Che programmi avete per il prossimo #weekend? A #Pasqua e #Pasquetta vi aspettiamo al #TeatroSanCarlo per dei turni speciali di #visiteguidate ! Tutte le info sul nostro sito nella sezione #News...#guidedtour #tour #Napoli #Naples #Italia #Italy #Feste #effettosancarlo A photo posted by Teatro San Carlo (@teatrosancarlo) on Mar 31, 2015 at 10:03am PDT Royal Opera House - London, UK Home to The Royal Opera and The Royal Ballet, the auditorium of the Royal Opera House has been relatively untouched since it was completely rebuilt after a fire in 1858 (caused by a cannon misfiring on stage). The ROH will be getting some big improvements to its front of house spaces over the next two years, thanks to the Open Up project, so expect plenty of stunning photos of our new surroundings. We also hosted the first ballet-inspired Instameet, #BalletBeauty . Welcome to Instagram, ROH supporters @Rolex #101031 A photo posted by Royal Opera House (@royaloperahouse) on Nov 28, 2015 at 2:10am PST Which opera houses are you following on Instagram? Let us know in the comments below.



Classical iconoclast

July 28

Potato Fudge and the Proms

Will things start livening up at the Proms next month ? In July, the fare predictable with rehashed reheated leftovers which were good first time round but not so exciting second time round.  Maybe this pasteurized blandness represents the Future if Classical Music, as defined by government thinktanks and BBC suits who think the public can't cope with real sustenance. Sir Henry Wood must be rolling in his grave !  He believed that the public would rise to the challenge of interesting work, and that ordinary people could develop listening skills. Now, instead we get pablum like Ten Pieces, catering to the lowest possible denominator, and to those don't even want to pay attention.   "We don't like experts!" the end of civilization ? So here we are, coming to the halfway point in this year's Proms, what do we have ahead ?  On Monday 1/8 I'm looking forward to John Storgårds conducting Neilsen 5 and Jörg Widmann's Armonica for glass harmonica. On 4/8,  Oliver Knussen conducts Reinbert de Leeuw Der nächtliche Wanderer  On 8/8 Esa Pekka Salonen conducts Schoenberg A Survivor from Warsaw, with Mahler's First  interesting combination ! Janacek The Makropulos Affair on 19/8 will be a high point, with Karita Mattila and Jiří Bělohlávek.  I'll be listening to a lot (eg Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla with the CBSO) but, while there are good things, there's a lot of not so good and little that's thrilling.  Somr odd mismatches between performer and repertoire.  So on to September when things wake up. Baldur Brönnimann conducts a very interesting late nighter on  29 with Ensemble Intercontemporain.  and on 49 Mark Elder conducts thge OAE in Rossini's Semiramide. In the Last Week, the Big Bands : The Berlin Philharmonic, Staatskapelle Berlin and Staatskapplle Dresden with Rattle, Barenboim and Thielemann. The media are playing this up as some kind of battle, but that's silly. People really into music don't need to play games with musicians as pawns. At this level there's no "competition", just excellence.  All is not lost, yet.

Gioacchino Rossini
(1792 – 1868)

Gioachino Rossini (February 29, 1792 - November 13, 1868) was an Italian composer who wrote 39 operas as well as sacred music, chamber music, songs, and some instrumental and piano pieces. His best-known operas include the Italian comedies Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville) and La cenerentola and the French-language epics Moïse et Pharaon and Guillaume Tell (William Tell). A tendency for inspired, song-like melodies is evident throughout his scores, which led to the nickname "The Italian Mozart." Until his retirement in 1829, Rossini had been the most popular opera composer in history.



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